roachpatrol:

cuckou:

Probs shits gold tinsel

this is definitely a fairy

roachpatrol:

cuckou:

Probs shits gold tinsel

this is definitely a fairy

(via iguanamouth)

foxadhd:

Pizza Princess 

foxadhd:

Pizza Princess 

(Source: foxadhd.com, via suzycom)

bobbycaputo:

HumanaePortraits Match People of Different Ethnicities With Their Pantone Color

Brazilian fine art photographer Angelica Dass‘ series Humanae identifies portrait subjects from around the world using the Pantone color system. Using an 11×11 pixel swatch from her subjects’ faces, Dass matches them to corresponding Pantone colors, creating an abundant and unique catalog of skin tones that reflects the world’s diversity beyond the categorizations we have long been confined to. We recently asked her more about the ongoing project.

(via avatar-mom)

neimana:

Depressed teenagers. Aku no Hana & Oyasumi punpun: mangas you should read.

neimana:

Depressed teenagers. Aku no Hana & Oyasumi punpun: mangas you should read.

(via aikurous)

art-conservation:


The discerning collector Grenville L. Winthrop, A.B. 1886, LL.B. ’89, bought this alleged Goya portrait of Maria Isabella de Bourbon, infanta of Spain (1741-1763) from a New York dealer in 1936. He gave it to the Fogg Art Museum in 1943, where it was considered genuine, although several scholars had doubts. Goya expert F.J. Sanchez-Canton, visiting from the Museo Nacional del Prado in the early 1950s, declared the painting a forgery on the basis of its modern surface. Conservator Elizabeth H. Jones wrote at the time of the “curious oily slickness of the paint.” The canvas was old, and the paint bore the crackle marks of age.
An x-ray image of the painting in 1954 revealed the presence of an earlier portrait of a woman beneath the surface, but a woman with a longer face. Analysis also proved the use of zinc white paint, invented after Goya’s death. Cleaning showed that the paint surface was indeed relatively modern and had been applied lightly enough so as not to obscure the craquelure of the original. The base painting, thought to be a Spanish provincial work of about 1790, was not in good shape; the face may have been partially abraded by the forger.
Conservators left some of the modern surface in place so that what we see today is a face half by the forger and half by his predecessor—useful for teaching and a result Jones characterized as a “split personality in paint.”

[via]

art-conservation:

The discerning collector Grenville L. Winthrop, A.B. 1886, LL.B. ’89, bought this alleged Goya portrait of Maria Isabella de Bourbon, infanta of Spain (1741-1763) from a New York dealer in 1936. He gave it to the Fogg Art Museum in 1943, where it was considered genuine, although several scholars had doubts. Goya expert F.J. Sanchez-Canton, visiting from the Museo Nacional del Prado in the early 1950s, declared the painting a forgery on the basis of its modern surface. Conservator Elizabeth H. Jones wrote at the time of the “curious oily slickness of the paint.” The canvas was old, and the paint bore the crackle marks of age.

An x-ray image of the painting in 1954 revealed the presence of an earlier portrait of a woman beneath the surface, but a woman with a longer face. Analysis also proved the use of zinc white paint, invented after Goya’s death. Cleaning showed that the paint surface was indeed relatively modern and had been applied lightly enough so as not to obscure the craquelure of the original. The base painting, thought to be a Spanish provincial work of about 1790, was not in good shape; the face may have been partially abraded by the forger.

Conservators left some of the modern surface in place so that what we see today is a face half by the forger and half by his predecessor—useful for teaching and a result Jones characterized as a “split personality in paint.”

[via]

rhamphotheca:

Amazonian Treasure Trove Yields 15 New Bird Species

by Nadia Drake

The Amazon rainforest, a well-known epicenter of biodiversity, has offered up another trove of riches. The treasure takes the form of 15 newly described bird species. Some are tiny. One has a long, curved bill. Another is super fluffy. All live in the southern Amazon, most of them in an area known as the “arc of deforestation.”

It’s been 140 years since as many new Brazilian bird species were described at one time. In 1871, 40 new species were described by Austrian August von Pelzeln in Zur Ornithologie Brasiliens.

Discovered mostly within the last five years, in southern swaths of forest, many of the birds live near rivers. Eleven can only be found in Brazil; four of the species have also been seen in Peru and Bolivia. Most are Passeriformes, belonging to an order that includes ravens, sparrows, and finches.

They were spotted on various expeditions that included ornithologist Luis Silveira, of the University of São Paulo, and his students, as well as collaborators from three additional institutions. Together, they noticed that these strange new birds didn’t quite fit in…

(read more: Wired Science)         (photos: Vitor de Q. Piacentini)

(via raptorwing)